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Different Options for Storing Your Collection

Aim to store your objects as per the recommendations in the 'best possible scenario' level. Use the 'absolute basics' level as a last resort.

Velvet caps

Selection of caps from World Rugby Museum collection

Photo: World Rugby Museum

  • Best possible scenario - Keep in individual acid-free boxes. Maintain the cap shape by stuffing with crunched-up conservation tissue. Do not flatten. Keep at 18-22°, 55-65 RH.
  • Preferable treatment - Maintain cap shape (do not flatten). Keep wrapped in conservation tissue. Store numerous caps in a large box supported with tissue.
  • Absolute basics - Maintain cap shape with general tissue. Keep covered, free from dust and light, in a cool and dry atmosphere.

Jerseys (& other fibre materials)

1912 France jersey

Photo: World Rugby Museum

  • Best possible scenario - Keep each object neat. Unfold the collar. Place conservation tissue between each layer of material and add extra tissue between folds and creases. House in individual conservation boxes. Keep at 18-22°, 55-65 RH.
  • Preferable treatment - Fold neatly. House numerous jerseys in a large conservation box, with conservation tissue between each jersey.
  • Absolute basics - Keep neat and flat without making folds too sharp. Separate from plastics or infected materials. Keep free from dust and light in a cool and dry atmosphere.

Plaques & trophies (Note: air oxidises brass)

Yorkshire Cup

Photo: World Rugby Museum

  • Best possible scenario - Wrap in archival tissue and place in conservation-grade melinex bags: trophies standing upright, plaques lying flat. Do not remove tarnish unless planning to display trophy. Abrasive metal-cleaning products remove a small layer of metal. Only use when necessary. Keep at 18-22°, 55-65 RH.
  • Preferable treatment - Wrap in archival tissue. Store in constant environmental conditions. High humidity will quicken the tarnishing of silver and brass. Do not remove tarnish with abrasive cleaning products unless planning to display object. Leave it tarnished while in storage.
  • Absolute basics - Wrap in tissue, protected from general environmental changes. Only clean trophy with abrasive cleaning product when you wish to display it. Otherwise leave it tarnished while in storage.

Photographs (Note: exposure to light is the biggest threat)

A black and white team lineup picture

Photo: World Rugby Museum

  • Best possible scenario - Place in individual melinex sleeves. Kept flat in acid-free boxes. Keep out of constant / direct light. Maintain constant environmental conditions. Keep at 11-18°, 50-65 RH.
  • Preferable treatment - Separate with archival tissue sheets and keep flat. Place in acid-free boxes. Keep out of constant / direct light.
  • Absolute basics - Keep flat, cool and dry. Keep out of constant / direct light.

Documents: books and match programmes

These are surprisingly fragile. This also includes parchments such as legal or architectural documents.

  • Best possible scenario - Keep original form of object (i.e. keep bound, do not cut pictures out, etc.). Wrap in conservation tissue. Store stacked in acid-free boxes (largest object at bottom). Do not use glue or tape! Keep at 11-18°, 50-65 RH
  • Preferable treatment - Keep original form. Place a sheet of tissue between each layer/object.
  • Absolute basics - Keep free from dust and in constant temperature and humidity.

Boots and balls, leather goods

A leather matchball

Photo: World Rugby Museum

  • Best possible scenario - Fill the objects with conservation grade tissue to support the shape of the leather. This may require opening the laces on both boots or balls. Then replace laces. Store in acid-free box. Handling leather with clean hands is acceptable. The natural oils from skin can keep the leather nourished. Keep at 11-25° (temperature levels are slightly more flexible for leather), RH 55-65.
  • Preferable treatment - Place objects in acid-free box individually. Handling leather with clean hands is OK. Keep in constant temperature and humidity.
  • Absolute basics - Keep out of strong light. Keep away from extreme high humidity (mould will grow) or extreme low humidity (leather will crack). Handling with clean hands is OK.

Documents

Match tickets, itineraries, menus, etc. Paper is very absorbent and grease is difficult to remove

  • Best possible scenario - Do not use glue or tape. Use acid-free boards as support to keep items flat. Do not allow to bend. Do not use staples, paperclips, thin string, elastic bands etc. to bind groups of objects. Keep in individual melinex sleeves or archival folders. House in acid-free boxes. Keep at 50-55 RH (high humidity causes acid reaction in paper and rusting of staples, paper clips etc.)
  • Preferable treatment - Do not use glue or tape. Do not fold. Keep in tidy piles where they are supported and will not warp or bend. Tie piles together with conservation ribbon. Keep covered in tissue and boxed. Keep in low humidity and cool temperature.
  • Absolute basics - Do not use glue or tape. Keep flat and boxed. Keep in constant temperature.

The World Rugby Museum, Twickenham hopes you have found the information regarding storage and display of your club’s collection helpful.

Remember that any improvement is beneficial. The best results can be achieved by implementing your actions in phases and part of a long-term plan. We hope you take the correct precautions in looking after the country’s sporting heritage.

For more information or advice, please feel free to call the World Rugby Museum, Twickenham. We will endeavour to advise you or point you in the right direction for the most appropriate care and use of your objects.

World Rugby Museum, Twickenham Stadium, Rugby Road, Twickenham, TW1 1DZ, Phone: 020 8892 8877, Fax: 020 8892 2817, Email: museum@rfu.com

 

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