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RWC 2015: Lead Up and Legacy

Rugby World Cup 2015 offers a unique opportunity to deliver a lasting participation legacy for rugby union in England. As part of these legacy plans, the Rugby Football Union (RFU) has outlined seven areas of focus in the lead up to 2015 and beyond.

From building capacity by improving facilities and increasing the quantity and quality of coaches, to getting more schoolchildren playing rugby or inspiring participation by encouraging players to return to the field, plans are underway to grow the game.

The seven legacy strands are:

  1. Facilities – The RFU has committed an investment of £10m to create £25m worth of improvements in club equipment and facilities benefiting over 500 clubs nationwide – from kit and equipment to clubhouses, changing rooms and floodlights to all-weather pitches
  2. People – New investment of over £1m to deliver more than 6,500 newly qualified referees and coaches. Staging masterclasses for over 5,000 existing coaches and referees along with a focus on young people, bringing in 5,000 additional club volunteers
  3. Schools – The RFU's All Schools programme will ensure more schools are offering rugby and will give over one million young people opportunities to play. The initiative aims to introduce the game into 400 non-rugby playing secondary schools by 2015 and up to 750 by 2019, by delivering a package of resources within the school
  4. Returning players – Working with colleges, universities and employers to inspire thousands of 16-24-year-old players back into clubs across England
  5. O2 Touch – Ambition to encourage 15,000 new players to take up rugby by broadening the reach and appeal of the game through more access to touch rugby. Over 200 club- and 100 university-based O2 Touch Centres will be set up by 2015, offering a range of pitch up and play activity, organised leagues and events
  6. Other nations – Building links between the RFU’s Constituent Bodies and over 15 of Europe’s key developing rugby nations to share knowledge on how best to grow and develop the game
  7. Cultural engagement – Developing a series of cultural programmes using art and photography to bring alive what rugby means to local communities, encouraging people across the country to talk about the game
 

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